Posts Tagged ‘Game Biz’

The Life Cycle of a Videogame {Gamespy}

June 25, 2009

Via gamespy.com:

life cycle of videogame

GameSpy: The Life Cycle of a Videogame – Page 1.

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Taxing violent video games

March 11, 2009

Yet again lawmakers are attempting to censor video games in ways that directly infringe on First Amendment rights and would not fly in other media.

Now it’s Pennsylvania and our British friends on the other side of the pond who are considering such legislation.

Pennsylvania took the first steps in this direction in 2007 by setting up a task force to study video game violence and potential legislation to address it. The task force released a report in December 2008 that recomended the state NOT pursue any censorship or legislation.

The Children & Youth Committee of the Pennsylvania House held a hearing to explore the issue this week. Game Politics extensively covered the hearing. It appears that some of the representatives were a little irked that the task force didn’t simply confirm their preudices and give them a green light to do what they will.

Violent video games were implied to have a causation with police shootings. The fact that the military sometimes uses games to train officers was mentioned (although military-grade games a specifically designed for that purpose). One rep even suggested a 5 percent tax on violent video games. (more…)

Game designers stuck in a rut, or a groove?

March 4, 2009

Commorancy over at Randosity posted a little bit ago on how he believes game designers are stuck in a rut and not progressing at the same pace as console hardware. He covers so much ground that I decided to respond through my own post as opposed to a comment.

First off, I agree that while games have become increasingly beautiful and complex it seems that designers have increasingly turned to proven gaming conventions as opposed to innovative new gameplay.

Mostly I see this as hedging their bets and not necessarily a bad thing. If they didn’t work well, they wouldn’t be conventions. When you are investing millions of dollars and one to two years to develop what you hope will be a AAA title, you probably don’t want to stray too far from what has been proven to work. If it aint broke… (more…)